The aim of this course is teach students about the social, economic, and financial implications of disasters as priority for the governments. It also includes The Damage, Loss, and Needs Assessment (DLNA) methodology, developed by the Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean (ECLAC) in the 1970s. Particularly, it comprises of i) the Design and Execution of a Damage, Loss and Needs Assessment for Task Team Leaders (TTL); ii) Conducting Damage and Loss Assessments after Disasters; and iii) Estimation of Post-Disaster Needs for Recovery and Reconstruction. The aim of this course is to train students in utilizing the above methodology to quantify the impacts of disasters and to determine the necessary financial resources to achieve full reconstruction and recovery of damaged assets. The final output is a DLNA report of a selected disaster that impacted the Philippines and the corresponding Reconstruction and Recovery Plan, Disaster Risk Strategy i.e. to retain, reduce, or transfer the disaster risk. It also includes identifying the socio-economic impact of any given disaster, as well as the exposure of sector assets. Further, report includes an estimation of expected hazards damage estimation to categorize the disaster i.e., minor, medium, or major disaster based on the damage shock on the economy of the impacted area i.e., local, regional, or national. The output can be individual or group effort and must be presented for oral defense.

This course includes the social, economic, and financial implications of disasters as priority for the government. It also includes The Damage, Loss, and Needs Assessment (DaLA) methodology, developed by the globally-recognized Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean (ECLAC) in the 1970s. Particularly, it comprises of: the Design and Execution of a Damage, Loss and Needs Assessment for Task Team Leaders (TTL); Conducting Damage and Loss Assessments after Disasters; and Estimation of Post-Disaster Needs for Recovery and Reconstruction. The aim of this course is to train students in utilizing the above methodology to quantify the impacts of disasters and to determine the necessary financial resources to achieve full reconstruction and recovery. Further, it includes identifying the socio-economic impact of any given disaster as well as the exposure of sector assets. It also reinforces resilience by promoting the “Build Back Better” principles in reconstruction and recovery efforts.

This course provides tools for leadership to be equipped for the development of global disaster and crisis management policies, strategies, and programming approaches—particularly the Principles and Rules for Disaster Relief and a new Global Disaster Management Strategic Operational Framework to reflect the changing humanitarian environment and the growing capacities of National Societies to coordinate and deliver humanitarian assistance. It includes fundamental knowledge on how to develop communication and collaboration between the departments and disaster management colleagues. It also includes the understanding of disaster response standard operating procedures that clarify roles and responsibilities, set standards, and help us to measure our efficiency, effectiveness, and impact of our operations in context of the Philippines.

The aim of this course is to teach students how to assess the hazard vulnerability and risk parameters for Community-Based Disaster Risk Reduction Plan (CBDRRP) about the social, economic, and financial implications of disasters as priority for governments. This course involves the study of community-based Disaster Risk Management concepts for local authorities with the aim to enhance the capacity of local government units on community-based Disaster Risk Management. The course is specifically designed for community leaders and Non-Government Organizations (NGOs), focusing on community-based needs and damage assessment, community-based prevention and mitigation planning, community-managed implementation, and monitoring and evaluation activities related to disaster risk reduction. The final output is the CBDRRP of the community under study. The output can be an individual or group effort and must be presented for oral defense.

This course provides students understanding regarding the environmentally critical projects and areas incorporated with natural hazards, climate change, and related risk consideration as a fundamental first step in broader project scoping. The findings should be used to determine if disaster and/or climate change risks should be examined in further detail in other components of the project appraisal process. The course also covers understanding regarding systematic analysis of the potential disaster or climate risk-related consequences of a project via its impact on the environment that is included as a central component of the assessment process, especially in hazard-prone areas. Measures to address identified environmental issues, including Disaster Risk Reduction/Climate Change Adaptation (DRR/CCA) concerns, are also part of this course.